Rohingya Journey

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Rohingya Journey

 

Forced to flee due to the brutal repression of the military regime in Burma, Rohingya refugees have been living in camps in southern Bangladesh for nearly three decades.

 

The lucky ones are granted asylum in a wealthy nation.

 

In a three part series Ric Wasserman follows the journey of the Ahmed family from the squalor of their refugee camp to their new home on the other side of the world in cold suburban Sweden.

 



From Tropical Squalor to Snow Covered Suburbia

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Forced to flee due to the brutal repression of the military regime in Burma, Rohingya refugees have been living in camps in southern Bangladesh for nearly three decades.

 

For the last three months, our reporter in Bangladesh, Ric Wasserman, has been tracing the lives of a group of these Rohingyas.

 

In a three part series we follow the Ahmed family, refugees living in squalor and with few lifelines.

 

Until one day, when their lives take an unexpected and remarkable turn.

Last Updated ( Tuesday, 29 September 2009 14:14 )
 

A New Life: Part Two in our Rohingya Series

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Last week on Asia Calling we began the story of the Amhed family, a group of Rohingya refugees from Burma who have been living for years in a squalid camp in Bangladesh.

 

As we heard last week, a most unexpected lifeline has been extended to them. They have been granted asylum in the European nation of Sweden.

 

In part two, our reporter Ric Wasserman follows the Ahmed family as they prepare for and embark on their journey to a new life, on the other side of the world.

Last Updated ( Tuesday, 29 September 2009 15:05 )
 

Planting Roots: Part three in our Rohingya Series

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Last week, in the second part of our Rohingya series, the Ahmed family and a larger group of refugees arrived in Sweden where they have been granted asylum.

Today in our third and final installment, Ric Wasserman visits them in Northern Sweden, three months after their arrival to find out how they are coping with a new climate and culture and whether the little town of Sorsele is beginning to feel like home.

Last Updated ( Tuesday, 29 September 2009 14:22 )
 

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